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Mike Cummins

Cummins Solicitors
“The response of my clients to the newsletter has been genuinely enthusiastic. They say, ‘I love getting your newsletter, it’s so enjoyable, user friendly and fun to read. I literally meet people on the street who haven’t seen me for ages, who stop me and say, ‘I love your newsletter.”

Clients come back to me from right across the range and say, ‘I really love that newsletter.’ – everyone from building societies down to the man in the corner shop. All of the feedback says the same thing, that the newsletter is really easy to read and is user friendly. They get the information the way they want to hear it. The responsefrom clients has been genuinely fantastic. They love getting the bulletin, and they come back to me with comments.

As a business we try to be accessible, and this ties in with the way Daniel writes his bulletin. It really really works for us. I disagree thatpeople in large businesses want bulletins with convoluted language that’s prim and proper, written from an ‘ivory tower’. They all want the same thing: pragmatic and down-to-earth advice delivered in a easy-to-understand way. Daniel’s bulletins are really user friendly like that. They go down really really well. In about 50% of the newsletters I add a paragraph or two about what’s current for us, and maybe a photo. And at the end it says ‘Best wishes, Mike’ to make it more personal. There’s no preparation time, and it’s really really easy... fantastically easy for me.

I’m running my business and I’m really busy, so I want people to take things off me. With Daniel’s bulletin I get all the benefits and none of the hassle: all the benefits of a really good newsletter and none of the hassle of having to send it or manage. So it saves me money. It’s not a cost: it’s a saving.

Because it goes out monthly, it’s topical, it’s live and it’s fresh. And Iknow that half of the organisations I send it to distribute it internally.There’s a flow to the newsletter. It reads like a story. You want to read it from start to finish. It’s not just like a piece of information that is being imparted. Daniel brings the law to life.

Many times clients have rung up and asked about a topic in the newsletter like family leave, saying ‘We didn’t realise about that’, sothey ask me to help them get their contracts redone. Other times, there may be some content about a type of misconduct such as social media, and a client would ring up and say, ‘I didn’t realise that was a potential disciplinary matter.’ So people will pick up on a theme in the newsletter and phone me on the back of that.

I’m a believer in keeping in touch with your clients, and having an ongoing relationship, so they don’t forget about you. Sometimes they don’t need us for six to 12 months, so it’s really important that we pop into their minds when an issue does come up. A regular newsletter is really good for concreting the relationship. The fact that it is monthly creates an ongoing positive image: they know theyare going to get something every month. So it’s incredibly useful to us.

We pay a fair and decent price for the newsletter. The amount of time it would take us to do it ourselves would be disproportionate. It’s cheaper to get Daniel to do it. I can better use my time doing other things. Plus it’s all managed. I just say, ‘Yes, that’s fine to go’,and it gets sent. Daniel knows that people rely on us so he makes sure it goes out on time. If I did it in house, the content would get sent back and forth between me and the writer before I was happy with it, then when I ask my secretary to send it, it might not get sentuntil the next day because they’re busy. This all has to be managed.That’s another hour or two of secretarial time. I genuinely look at my marketing budget and know that Daniel’s bulletin would be the last thing I’d drop.
Hear what Mike has to say:
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David Parry

Parry Employment Lawyers
“The response of my clients to the newsletter has been genuinely enthusiastic. They say, ‘I love getting your newsletter, it’s so enjoyable, user friendly and fun to read. I literally meet people on the street who haven’t seen me for ages, who stop me and say, ‘I love your newsletter.”

Clients come back to me from right across the range and say, ‘I really love that newsletter.’ – everyone from building societies down to the man in the corner shop. All of the feedback says the same thing, that the newsletter is really easy to read and is user friendly. They get the information the way they want to hear it. The responsefrom clients has been genuinely fantastic. They love getting the bulletin, and they come back to me with comments.

As a business we try to be accessible, and this ties in with the way Daniel writes his bulletin. It really really works for us. I disagree thatpeople in large businesses want bulletins with convoluted language that’s prim and proper, written from an ‘ivory tower’. They all want the same thing: pragmatic and down-to-earth advice delivered in a easy-to-understand way. Daniel’s bulletins are really user friendly like that. They go down really really well. In about 50% of the newsletters I add a paragraph or two about what’s current for us, and maybe a photo. And at the end it says ‘Best wishes, Mike’ to make it more personal. There’s no preparation time, and it’s really really easy... fantastically easy for me.

I’m running my business and I’m really busy, so I want people to take things off me. With Daniel’s bulletin I get all the benefits and none of the hassle: all the benefits of a really good newsletter and none of the hassle of having to send it or manage. So it saves me money. It’s not a cost: it’s a saving.

Because it goes out monthly, it’s topical, it’s live and it’s fresh. And Iknow that half of the organisations I send it to distribute it internally.There’s a flow to the newsletter. It reads like a story. You want to read it from start to finish. It’s not just like a piece of information that is being imparted. Daniel brings the law to life.

Many times clients have rung up and asked about a topic in the newsletter like family leave, saying ‘We didn’t realise about that’, sothey ask me to help them get their contracts redone. Other times, there may be some content about a type of misconduct such as social media, and a client would ring up and say, ‘I didn’t realise that was a potential disciplinary matter.’ So people will pick up on a theme in the newsletter and phone me on the back of that.

I’m a believer in keeping in touch with your clients, and having an ongoing relationship, so they don’t forget about you. Sometimes they don’t need us for six to 12 months, so it’s really important that we pop into their minds when an issue does come up. A regular newsletter is really good for concreting the relationship. The fact that it is monthly creates an ongoing positive image: they know theyare going to get something every month. So it’s incredibly useful to us.

We pay a fair and decent price for the newsletter. The amount of time it would take us to do it ourselves would be disproportionate. It’s cheaper to get Daniel to do it. I can better use my time doing other things. Plus it’s all managed. I just say, ‘Yes, that’s fine to go’,and it gets sent. Daniel knows that people rely on us so he makes sure it goes out on time. If I did it in house, the content would get sent back and forth between me and the writer before I was happy with it, then when I ask my secretary to send it, it might not get sentuntil the next day because they’re busy. This all has to be managed.That’s another hour or two of secretarial time. I genuinely look at my marketing budget and know that Daniel’s bulletin would be the last thing I’d drop.
Hear what David has to say:
Image

David Parry

Parry Employment Lawyers